A Lesson on Thanksgiving When the Happy Ending Has Not Come Yet!

Habakkuk ended his prophecy like this:

Though the fig tree does not bud
and there is no fruit on the vines,
though the olive crop fails
and the fields produce no food,
though there are no sheep in the pen
and no cattle in the stalls,
18 yet I will triumph in Yahweh;
I will rejoice in the God of my salvation!
19 Yahweh my Lord is my strength;
He makes my feet like those of a deer
and enables me to walk on mountain heights! (Habakkuk 3:17-19)

Now, Habakkuk was not always in this praise place. In fact, if you read the whole book of Habakkuk, he was very far away from this place.

Habakkuk most likely prophesied just before the beginning of the exile when the sin of Judah is at the peak. Habakkuk questioned God as to how long He would allow sin to reign in Judah (1:1-4). God answered back that He was preparing the Babylonians to deal with Judah’s sin (1:5-11). Habakkuk’s second question concerns how God could use the Babylonians, who were more wicked, to be the instrument of judgment against Judah (1:12-2:1).

When God answers Habakkuk’s questions we learn several important truths.

1. God is always at work even if we do not see how He is at work.
2. God will speak at the right time.

And so, we must learn to walk by faith.

Habakkuk’s name in Hebrew means something like “one who embraces” or “one who clings.” That’s what we must do sometimes—cling to or embrace our faith in God. Sometimes all we have is to cling to our faith.

Maybe today your prayer sounds a lot like Habakkuk’s opening words of his praise. Maybe your prayer goes like this:

Though the sugar cane crops yield no sugar
And the oil wells all dry up
Even though there may be no money in the bank
Yet, I will rejoice in the Lord!

Though I share Christ with all my neighbors and family
But there are no decisions
And, even though, the Doctor called last week
And the news is not good
Yet, I will rejoice in the Lord!
He is my salvation and hope!

You only get to those last words by faith!

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